Primary Purpose of a Mold Inspection


The presence of molds inside an enclosure may greatly affect the air quality inside the enclosed space in the sense that molds, that are of airborne spore species, are a common allergen and may induce sneezing, runny nose, cough, eye irritation, upper respiratory irritation, and, in severe reactions, asthma attack, to people who are likely allergic to molds. When there is mold growth inside a building, it is an indication of a water problem, which could mean that there is excessive water leaking somewhere in the building of which when it produces a damp condition can richly invite for mold growth. Another adverse effect of mold presence inside a building establishment is that they can cause structural damage by decomposing wood and porous materials, drywalls, and even carpeting.

The purposes of conducting a mold inspection are the following: testing for the presence of molds inside an establishment; when there is a positive presence, identifying the mold species; locating where the molds are growing inside the establishment; and, when remedial action has been done to remove the molds, a post-inspection is performed to assess if the molds have been completely eliminated.

Mold inspection observes these five steps: interview of occupants or building maintenance caretaker, visual inspection, sampling, sampling analysis, and reporting.

Common issues inquired through the interview by the mold inspector are on these topics: humidity inside the building, mold smell, any possible roof or plumbing leaks, or detected mold presence inside the building. Read More Now!

When the inspector receives a positive reporting from the owner or caretaker of mold presence, he performs a visual inspection into the spot areas where there is likely water penetration or evidence of a mold habitat existing, using tools like moisture meters for detecting moisture, hydrometers for measuring the humidity, borescopes for viewing sections of walls, or laser thermometers for checking on the surface temperatures, as well as digital photographs, if the mold presence is detected.

The third important task of the mold inspector is to take air samples, outside and inside the building, by using a special sample instrument that can collect mold spores and provide counting results of spores collected, thereby giving a good analysis if the air quality inside the building has deteriorated.

A special laboratory analyst handles the given air samples by determining the number of mold spores present per cubic meter of air and, at the same time, analysing the kind of mold specie found in the building.

The summary report of the mold inspector constitutes the visual proof of mold presence, spore level in the air in the building, mold specie present, conclusions and recommendations in maintaining the building condition, as well as measures to remove the presence of molds. Learn More Now!

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